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When Should Your Child Start Kindergarten




The decision of when to enroll a child in kindergarten is a big one for parents. Some parents question when to enroll their child in school. Should they do it as soon as possible or wait until the child is more mature?


The decision of when to enroll a child in kindergarten is a big one for parents. Some parents question when to enroll their child in school. Should they do it as soon as possible or wait until the child is more mature?


In most states, children must be 5 years old by August or September to enter kindergarten that academic year. However, state laws and school districts' policies can vary greatly. The enrollment cutoff date can sometimes fall after the school year has begun. As a result, children as young as four can be eligible for kindergarten


Some states don’t require kindergarten, and some districts, such as New York City's, don’t allow redshirting. In practice, these disparate policies mean that caregivers are frequently given a lot of latitude around the decision


RRedshirting, the practice of delaying kindergarten, may benefit kids in certain circumstances, but there are also drawbacks to waiting. Delaying kindergarten might be a good idea for children with developmental delays or for children who have experienced trauma


For children who are born close to the enrollment cutoff date, delaying kindergarten may provide extra time for learning and maturity. Boredom is a concern for older children. Students who enroll later tend to have an initial academic advantage.


However, this advantage may not last as the students progress in their schooling. Finally, the financial burden associated with another year of child care or preschool is a challenge for many families


There are long-term effects associated with waiting to enroll a child in kindergarten. Being young compared to other students in the grade has been associated with higher rates of certain diagnoses.


A 2018 study showed students who were young for their grade were more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD. Research has found that students born late in the year are more likely to be identified with a learning disability. This is compared to those born earlier in the year.


Furthermore, the decision to enroll a child in kindergarten is a difficult one for parents. While redshirting may benefit some children, it is not always the best option. Parents should take into account their child's individual needs.


They should discuss their worries with their pediatrician. Additionally, they should be aware of the long-term impacts of postponing kindergarten. Ultimately, parents must decide what is best for their child and their family.


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